How to Get Along with your Nanny

  • Have a written job description. Nanny Network outlines different things you might want to include when you write a job description for your nanny.
  • Outline your nanny role. The Nanny Doctor explains the importance of being clear about your expectations and how you want things done. Be sure to explain any pet peeves you may have, so your nanny is able to avoid them.
  • Screen your caregiver. According to Childcare About, you should ask a lot of questions when you screen potential nannies and check all of the references you’re given.
  • Hire the right person. Finding the perfect caregiver is tough; Huffington Post encourages employers to ask plenty of questions to make sure the nanny is right for both your child and for you.
  • Observe wage laws. The Law reviews all of the wage law details you will need to know when hiring a nanny.
  • Comply with tax laws. Parents explains how you can get in trouble by not paying taxes.
  • Have a work agreement in writing. You can find suggestions about what to include in a family/nanny work agreement on eNannysource.
  • Remember there is a honeymoon period. Keep in mind that your nanny will be trying to make a good impression in the beginning; if you find that you don’t like something she is
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    doing, I Saw Your Nanny suggests discussing it with her openly.
  • Encourage communication. Make time to talk to your nanny and ask how things are going, saysKate Spenser.
  • Have your nanny keep a journal. A daily journal allows you to stay up to date on what your kids are doing and gives your nanny a place to write down any questions or concerns she has, explainsOptimom.
  • Hold weekly touch base meetings. Nanny Insider points out that including weekly or monthly meetings in your work contract helps everyone stay on the same page.
  • Show gratitude. Parents Nanny Voice suggests telling your nanny when she is doing a good job to build a strong relationship with her.
  • Address any issues as they come up. The New York Times reports that strong women have trouble communicating with their nanny. It’s important that you tell your nanny if there is a problem.
  • Come home on time. Respect your nanny’s time and call ahead of time if you are going to be late.Park Slope Parents also suggests keeping timesheets so that everyone knows the hours worked.
  • Avoid job creep. Nanny Biz explains job creep, which is when an employer asks for a favor and then the task becomes an expected part of the job. If you need your nanny’s job responsibilities to change, discuss updating your work agreement with her.
  • Tell your nanny thank you. The Parent Guru warns that nannies who don’t feel appreciated may start looking for another job. Showing gratitude and saying thank you can be very different, and both are appreciated.
  • Encourage the nanny/child relationship. Forbes explains that it’s better for the child if both the mother and nanny can encourage a trusting relationship between the nanny and child.
  • Deal with jealously on your own time. Global Post points out that nannies and their chargers have to bond to have trust; don’t take it personally.
  • Have boundaries. Whether you have a live-in or live-out nanny, boundaries are important;Cambridge Nanny Group recommends discussing both your boundaries and hers.
  • Be professional. As a boss, you need to speak to your nanny in a pleasant manner and treat her as a professional, says Babble. It’s easy for relationship lines to blur when the caregiver is living in the home.
  • Be respectful of your nanny’s time off. Part-time Nanny points out that your nanny needs down time too; she is more likely to do her job well when she is well rested.
  • Don’t add extra duties without discussing extra pay. Always be up front about any added duties so your nanny doesn’t feel like you are taking advantage of her, recommends Aunt Emma.
  • Avoid changing your nanny’s schedule without asking. Parent Talk urges parents to talk to their nanny as soon as they know a schedule change will be happening to show you respect her personal time.
  • Don’t raise your voice to your nanny. Baby Zone points out that respecting your nanny is your number one tool for creating a good relationship, so treat your nanny as you would want to be treated at work.
  • Pay your nanny on time and a fair wage. Yahoo Shine explains that you typically get what you pay for, so if you want someone with a degree you had better be prepared to pay better than minimum wage.
  • Round up on your nanny’s paycheck. If your nanny works over by half an hour, you may want to consider rounding up to an hour, suggests The Nanny Web. Little things that you do will come back to you in a happier nanny.
  • Give your nanny an annual review. Go Nannies recommends giving your nanny an annual review to discuss what she’s doing well and where she can improve.
  • Talk to your nanny about changing rules. It’s important to change the contract that you have with your nanny if you will be changing her job responsibilities or the house rules, according to Black, White and Grey.
  • Back up your nanny’s discipline. You need to back up your nanny’s disciplinary actions to help reinforce her role in the household, says Discipline.
  • Provide paid sick time and holidays. Offering paid time off for illness and holidays is a smart way to create a positive relationship with your nanny, according to Club Mom.
  • Reward her at the end of the year with a bonus. While you are not required to give your nanny a bonus, it is one way to strengthen the relationship, advises Homework Solutions.
  • Trust that your nanny knows her job. Nannies typically come to the job with a lot of experience and training; Cambridge Nanny Group explains that you can trust your nanny’s skills.
  • Recognize the nanny’s big events. Nanny recognition week is in September, according toRegarding Nannies; it would be a nice gesture to do something sweet for your nanny during this week or for other big events she celebrates.
  • Remember the nanny’s birthday. Reason for God points out that you should give your nanny gifts every so often, such as on her birthday.
  • Make sure the rules are clearly explained. Setting ground rules with your nanny can ensure that everyone is on the same page, explains Self Growth.
  • Offer medical insurance as a job perk. If you want to keep your nanny, Mommy Bites says to consider offering health insurance.
  • Give your nanny guaranteed hours. Nanny Biz explains how guaranteed hours work and why it’s so important that you pay your nanny for them, whether you need her or not.
  • Provide professional development classes. If your nanny is willing to take classes to improve in her job, like those offered by Project Bond, it would be a nice gesture to pay for them.
  • Help your nanny stay organized. If you have several people that need to be aware of upcoming events, use a digital or physical calendar to keep everyone in the loop, says The Charlotte Observer.
  • Listen to your nanny’s ideas. Nannies are often well-educated about children, and you will make her day by asking for her advice or using her ideas, say My Majors.
  • Don’t drag your nanny into your personal issues. Putting the nanny in the middle of marital issues can make everyone uncomfortable, warns The Guardian. Keep your private life private and expect your nanny to do the same.
  • Try not to take advantage of your nanny. Ganz World urges parents to avoid asking for a bunch of favors without adequate compensation. Your nanny wants to please you and will pitch in where she can, but don’t make a habit of it.
  • Maintain a pleasant relationship, but avoid being too personal. Wall Street Journal points out that you are the employer, not your nanny’s mom or best friend, and it’s important to maintain those boundaries no matter how much you like her.
  • Don’t use a nanny cam. Using a hidden camera to spy on your nanny could damage your nanny relationship beyond repair, explains Top Ten Reviews.
  • Be consistent with dietary rules. If the rule is no sugar, then neither the parents nor the nanny should give the child sugar, says She Knows.
  • Have realistic expectations. Buckingham Nannies and Domestics explains the importance of ensuring your nanny isn’t overwhelmed. Try not to stretch her too thin.
  • Help your nanny adjust to the job. Superpages reminds parents to give a new nanny time to adjust to her new role.
  • Get to know your nanny. Taking time to get to know your nanny is especially important if she is from a different country, advises Super Nannies. How she reacts or communicates may differ from how you do.
  • Do not reprimand the nanny or question her in front of the kids. Nanny Robina suggests keeping your tone neutral if an incident occurs and you need to ask her questions about it. Get all of the facts before you correct something the nanny has done.
  • Don’t micromanage your nanny. Your nanny knows her business – otherwise you wouldn’t have hired her. Unnecessary Wisdom says to let her do her job.


SfNanny said...

What a great list! I pretty much agree on all the above. Thanks for sharing!

Anonymous said...

At the interview always ask whether you are guarantee 52 weeks and 40 /50 hrs per week.