Friday

Salary suggestions...

Received Friday, July 4, 2008- Perpective & Opinion
I am a mother who is hiring her first nanny. I live in NYC and I looked online to see average salaries but couldnt really come up with a consistent salary. Would any of you nannies or moms like to share with me what you feel is a good salary. The hours are going to be 8-6 and she will be live-in. Should I give her any benefits? I would like to do on the books. Can you guys help me out and give me some ideas?? You dont have to live in NYC either I would just like some ideas and some comparison. Thanks!! Oh, and its just one child, 3 months old-I will be working away from home.

64 comments:

Westchester nanny said...

As a nanny with no benefits I believe if you are financially able to provide these you should. Paying on the books in NYC may provide a challenge for you as many people like to be paid off. A live-in makes a bit less than a live-out as a NY resident I would say at least 500/week which you could include one Saturday night/month and one weekday evening if needed. I know in NYC that's what many live-in nannies make as a starting salary and as a former live-in I believe it to be a good base wage. Good luck with your search.

Anonymous said...

Holy shit. Who do you work for?
The one Saturday night a month thing is an agency ploy. Agencies get paid by empployers, so they have no problem screwing the nanny. I am a live in, I work in NYC and take care of one two year old and make $850 per week, on the books and have health insurance on my employer's policy, a gym membership and 4 weeks off paid per year. One I get to choose and 3 when they are away traveling.

Anonymous said...

I'm in Philadelphia and for those hours I make $650 live out, so for NYC it should be more. And I don't do Saturday nights as part of that. I have 4 weeks off paid a year as well.

Anonymous said...

When I lived in the city, from all the people I knew in my apt. building and in my son's preschool, I was just about the only person who had a nanny on the books. Staggering. Fyi, we used Breedlove which I think is in Texas but handled everything for us regarding our nanny's taxes.

We did not provide health insurance nor did our nanny ask for it. We did give two weeks paid vacation, paid sick days and all holidays including bank holidays which in retrospect was more holidays than a nanny should have, especially if you work.

If we aked our nanny to stay late one night, I paid time and 1/2 and paid for her taxi home. I do not feel that late nights or saturday nights should just come with the job and a nanny should be compensated for that seperately.

leah said...

The Mormon nannies who are recruited out of Utah and sent out to the NYC area to work for about $500 a week usually have to do the One saturday night a month thing and the one night a week thing. The good thing is when these nannies get out here, they see what other nannies are making, wise up and leave their miserable, penny pinching families in a lurch.

Pay a fair wage!

Anonymous said...

I am a live in nanny in NYC that makes $900 a week and I get 2 weeks paid vacation, all food expenses paid, I get paid when they go on vacation which is about 4 weeks a year, and I get paid health insurance and full use of the gym and pool in the building. I watch one child who is almost 1. I also got a $2000 bonus for Xmas. I would say something in the $800 is average for a live in nanny in NYC. If you want her to stay pay her well and offer some paid vacation. Health insurance is not really standard but it is really nice to offer. Ohh--and this salary is only mon-friday. If I babysit after 630pm weeknights or anytime on the weekends I get $18/hour.

Anonymous said...

I live in San Diego, live out, watch a two-year-old full time and two older children part time. I make $620 per week, take home, off the books. I get no sick/personal days or my own vacation days and no health insurance.

I beleive I am getting screwed and advise you to do better than this, especially since you live in NY.
Thanks for taking the time to ask!

Anonymous said...

This "Mormon Nanny" went to NYC and wouldn't settle for less than $900/week (live in). That included the benefits of health insurance, a membership to the same club as the parents, 2 weeks paid vacation of my choice, and 2 weeks paid vacation of thier choice.

I love my job and wouldn't have traded it for the world. I still stay in touch with the family!

emily said...

I think that $15/hour is a fair starting wage in NYC. If you want her to work a 50 hour week, that's $750/week--but consider going to $800 if you think you may need a little "wiggle room" with the 6pm end time.

You should absolutely pay at least a majority portion of her benefits (look into the Freelancer's Union if the candidate you go w/doesn't already have a provider). Medical bills, especially emergency medical bills are the number one cause of personal bankrupcy in this country (or, at least that was the case a few years age). Consider how you'd feel if you had a nanny working for you who suffered a major accident? while on the job?

nyc mom said...

I am a mom in nyc who employs a live out nanny. I know many, many people who employ live out and live in nannies.

I agree with the first post. A take home of $500 weekly is a very common salary for a starting salary for a live-in nanny. Of course, for your nanny to net this you will generally be expected to "gross up" which should be around $700 a week. Of course, as people above have pointed out, you will have to pay more for someone with years of nanny experience, which is very likely the candidates you will be looking at since you are paying on the books. This applies to a work week of approximately 45 hours and is often Tues-Saturday with Sunday, Monday off work (I know this statement will be disputed, but all but one of the families I know with live-ins have their nanny work these days which was clearly stated and agreed upon at hiring).

One thing to keep in mind when asking this question on ISYN is that the sampling of nannies replying is likely to reflect the more educated and informed nannies in the field, thus you are likely to see nannies on here reporting a higher wage than that you will encounter in real life. I have always firmly advised people to ask around to colleagues and friends in the area where you will be hiring (even though it can be an uncomfortable question to ask) to get more relevant numbers. Although there are absolutely live-in nannies in NYC grossing $900 and live out making $1000 weekly, that is simply not the norm. Of course, all the usual disclaimers apply - treat your nanny with respect, stick to the hours and benefits stated in your work agreement, and communicate often. But as with any field it is a competitive market economy and I would not recommend overpaying initially. Best to hire someone at a market rate and if they are wonderful, give them a well-deserved raise which reflects their performance because they have now become a much more valued employee to you.

Active Family Services said...

Although Berkeley, CA is far, far away from NYC both places have high cost of living in common. You might find the Berkeley Parents Network 2008 Nanny Survey useful:
http://parents.berkeley.edu/survey/nanny2008_results.html

Jessica B.

Yaya said...

For a legitimate nanny that will actually be good to your child, and not turn out to be one of those bad nannies you read about on this site, I would plan to spend toward $900, but, since you want on the books for all of it that could put it up toward $1000, depending on what part of the city you live in. However, since you are going to offer benefits, you could pay as little as $750 (in my opinion), depending on the level of experience and education you want. Def offer any/all food she wants.
And for ppl hiring: why, oh why, do ppl ever hire illegal immigrants with no education to be the primary care giver for their child and then are surprised when this nanny is neglectful and/or abusive?? You get what you pay for, that's my biggest advice for you. The fact that you are bothering to do right by your nanny at such an early stage by trying to pay her right is awesome, and I bet you will be a great employer!

Anonymous said...

It is confusing, because there is a huge range of salaries. The reason for this is the very loose use of the term nanny. You can hire someone who is not legal to work, and is poorly qualified, off the books for a low salary, or a highly educated and experienced professional nanny who will command a high salary and benefits, and work on the books. (There are several services that help with the paperwork to take care of paying your obligation re nanny taxes.) There is quite a range between the two extremes.
For a 50 hour week, live in, on the books, I would say the minimum would be $750. You may find that those that you want to hire expect considerably more. Many top nannies in NYC make over 52 K. Offer any perks you can.
You should have a contract, listing the nanny's duties, vacation and holidays, sick/personal days, etc. I advise against the suggestion that you include evenings in the contract. Anything over the 50 weekday hours should be paid at an agreed upon hourly rate. There are a number of sample contracts on the net.
When interviewing, speak to references extensively, and ask the nanny you decide on to do a trial week.
Hope this helps, good luck in finding wonderful care for your baby!
UES Nanny

Anonymous said...

How do you find these jobs paying 800+ per week? I have been a nanny for 14 years and never even interviewed for a job making this much. I'm making the most I've ever made now and make $640 live out on the books and I do cleaning when the mother is home. Am I getting ripped off?? I read these posts and am amazed. Are the families you work for good quality people or stereotypical NYC wealthy?

emily said...

Each family is different, 4:52. If you want a better job, I suggest you register with some agencies in your area. Tell them you won't go to interview w/families paying less than $800. Then see what you find, take your time, interview the families references. Good nannies should find good, well-paying families.

Anonymous said...

To 4:52: Going through an agency is no gaurantee the nanny doesn't get shafted. These agencies work for the families, are paid by the families...you think they actually "screen" the families to determine they are not liars, or crazy people, or can actually afford to pay what they promise, or will stick to the work/benefit agreement once they've got you by the heartstrings? I've yet to hear any nanny mention how the agency she was placed by went to bat for her to help resolve any of the problems or miserable working conditions that some of these jobs turn into. Better to promote yourself on the free "nanny seeking family" sites to find prospective employers, and work with the family directly in coming up with a work agreement...find out right off the bat if you and they can actually communicate and negotiate.
To OP: Figure out what you can actually afford to spend on childcare, and find the absolute BEST nanny your money will pay for. Do all the work of background and reference checks, and have the first month be a "trial" period, no matter how stellar her experience or references may be. Too many problems arise as the result of a "bad fit" (not necessarily bad people) between nanny and employer. If you think the person who cleans your toilets should be paid more than the person accepting respnsibility for care and nurturing your child, you're on the WRONG track.

UWS Nanny said...

OP: Although not cheap, my advice is to go through an agency. The majority of agencies will only register nannies with checkable references who are legal to work in the US, these nannies will be more "professional" than someone you may come across on say Craigslist.The agency will then be able to answer any questions you may have about salary, perks, hours etc.

Anonymous said...

4:52 PM
If you have a college degree, (and you don't have to have an ECE major), plus experience and great references, you should be able to get a high salaried job through one of the better agencies.
I have worked for very nice families, and they weren't all super wealthy, at least not by NYC standards, but they made quality child care a top priority.

Anonymous said...

I'm in Ohio and make $500/wk, live out ON CALL. My hours are flexible as are my days. But for this area of the country, this is a good salary. I do not have benefits of health or other, and I watch an 8 mo old. I travel with the family and they pay all my expenses for that. They tip me often and give me gifts of concert tickets and such, which is nice,...and always remember holidays and occasions.

Anonymous said...

ok I am confused here. I thought live ins get less then live outs. I was a live out and started w/ $10 an hour, then a yr later got $2.00 per hour raise. I also worked between 40-50 hours per week and brought home 400-500 a week off the books. I also was able to use the pc when the child was sleeping, eat the food and use the phone. From what everyone is saying I should of gotten more..

chick said...

OP. figure out what you can afford to spend on a nanny salary, now and in the future, since raises will be expected yearly. At that point, contact agencies and ask what nannies who are looking for that salary level have to offer. (College degrees? How many years of experience?) Also ask about standard benefits for nannies. In my experience, 2 weeks paid vacation, the standard paid holidays, paid sick/personal time, and health insurance assistance.

If you want to pay on the books, I believe you will generally pay a higher salary, because nannies who are not willing to dodge taxes are often more of the "professional" nanny type than the "park bench" nanny type.

This site has info on salary and benefits:

http://www.4nannies.com/info/salary.cfm

Anonymous said...

I applied for a job in Bergen County NJ. It was for a SAHM. To help out a couple of days. Two children infant and toddler. Besides taking care of the kids she wanted some housework done too.
She asked what salary I was looking into. I said $15 per hour, and was told that was more than what they are willing to pay.

I don't think it was unreasonable. Considering I do occasional Saturday nite babysitting for two older boys. I get $15hr plus sometimes they throw in a little extra.

Anonymous said...

Can I ask those Nannies getting paid paid more than $800/week in UES, what their credentials are? Are you college graduates/PHds in childcare as well as having a number of years of nanny experience?

Anonymous said...

I live in Westchester County and nanny salaries vary a lot based on experience and qualifications. Some nannies in my neighborhood make as little as $500 per week, but they tend to be non-citizens or have little childcare experience. Sometimes you can get a great caregiver at the low end of the spectrum (afterall, everyone had a first nanny job), but be very careful, most in this price range are poor. When we looked for a nanny last year, we wanted citizens only with high school diploma from here and either college or childcare training. We interviewed nannies looking for anything from $500 to $1000. Most in the $500 range didn't make it past the telephone interview and even several in the $1000 range just did not have the background we were looking for. I actually ended up hiring a nanny who only asked for $500 a week during the interview and she's great. She had never worked as a nanny before but had worked in two daycares and was running an in-home daycare and was close to a degree in early childhood education. Because we felt she was underpricing herself, we offered her $600 a week and because she was really wonderful, we raised her to $650 after a month and will be raising her to $700 on her anniversary in 3 weeks. Generally, a good nanny should be in a $700 range an excellent, experienced nanny will be even higher. As for benefits, we offer two weeks paid vacation (her choice, but with at least one month's notice), pay her if we take time off and don't need her to come in, paid sick and personal time, $1000 for Christmas plus gifts for her and her familiy, $500 for her birthday and a personal gift as well as little gifts for things like valentine's day, and other minor holdidays just to show how much we appreciate her. I don't offer medical, nor has she asked for it (she is covered through her husband). Also, make sure you do litte things like leave petty cash for her that allows her the freedom to go out or order food out once and awhile, ask her what her favorite foods are and stock them in the house, etc. and make time every few weeks just to talk to her about how things are going. And make sure you have realistic expectations of what a nanny is--don't expect her to be your housekeeper, encourage her to take advantage of naptime to rest herself so she has the energy to engage with your child, talk to her about what type of activities she would like to do with your child and reach agreement before signing up for activities you want her to take your baby to.

Anonymous said...

Since your child is so young- I strongly suggest you focus on a qualified, experienced nanny. Therefore, you will need to offer no less than $16-$17 per hour for a live-in nanny. ($800-$900 per week).

Salary is based upon location, ages/number of children- duties/perks- nannies, qualifications, education, and experience- as well as if she is continuting and keeping updated on her nanny/childcare experience- thru attending seminars/ and being invovled in nanny organziations-
i.e., NANC / INA/ Association for the Education of Young Children.

Most nannies in NYC earn $500 per week- because they are uneducated, and don't hold childcare degrees.

Many think they can go to NYC and find a $1,000 per week position.
Reality is that many parents are OK with the $500 per week nanny-
and that is why that is the "norm"-
and then you hear about the "bad" nanny sightings.

If you go thru an agency- check them out on the better business site- and also google" Questions to ask nanny placement agencies".
Even if an agency says they have checked the nanny out- personally ask her the questions again- and call her references, ask to see origionals of her CPR/1st Aid/ Driver's Lic. Educational Degrees, etc.

You may also want to try contacting a local nanny support group in the area...usually they can give you REAL - FIRST HAND Expereince and info. , as well as insight into the nanny profession/salaries/best agencies to use.

I believe the one in NYC is-
Nanny Alliance of NY & NJ
www.nannyalliancenyandnj.com

Jane Doe said...

ISYN did a salary survey last year.

http://childcaregonewrong.blogspot.com/2007/06/salary-survey-results.html

UmassSlytherin said...

Whatever you decide, OP, I strongly suggest you pay your nanny on the books. It is best for you and for the nanny. If you do not, you can not claim childcare expenses, and the nanny will not be protected in the event of needing workers comp. or disability. It will also be an audit flag. Furthermore, if you hire a nanny who does not claim their income, chances are she is not responsible financially, or else is not legally able to do so.

Good luck: please let us know what you decide, we are all curious!

Anonymous said...

I disagree with 11:10am and the premise that the younger the child, the more qualified the nanny you need. When my children were babies, I felt that needing and ECE, highly educated nanny was fairly unnecessary. At that age, I focused more on kindness, being a mother herself, responsible, flexible, etc. The nanny I hired was perfect, despite having only a high school degree. However, once my kids hit school age and started having homework (about 6yo), I found that was when I cared more about having someone who was educated and that's when it mattered. Before that, I found it fairly irrelevant. I think if OP thinks there is a good chance she will not need a nanny into school years or can switch to someone part-time such as a student at that point, then the education and experience is less relevant.

SarahinChicago said...

I live in Chicago, and I make 650 a week live out. I work between 10-20 hours a week, depending on what needs to be done that week.

I am college educated, working on my master's degree in Elementary Education, young, active, EXTREMELY flexible and experienced. I also get paid on the books. I do not have insurance provided, rather I buy that independently. I can take as much paid time off as I'd like, as long as I give a fair amount of notice. Starting in September when school starts for me, I will be down to 3 nights a week, so on the lower of the hour scale.

I also act as a personal assistant for my boss, and if she EVER needs anything I never say no because she treats me like gold. She is incredibly nice to me, and thankful for everything I have ever done. I go out of my way to keep her life running smoothly and her child as happy as can be. She is an amazing boss, and I try to repay that by working my tail off. She also throws in perks, like gift cards to dinner places, tickets to plays, anything she has that she can't use.. This is by far the BEST job I have ever had.

The moral of my story is, yes, money goes far in an employees life, but I being a great boss to them is also key. I'd bend over backwards for my current employer, and I know she would do the same for me.

I would pay your live in nanny as much as you can afford. With higher salary comes a higher education, higher work ethic, and a longer term relationship. (In my experience)

mimi said...

When I stopped nannying in OHIO I was making 580.00 a week bring home, that was for 45 hours and living out. I can't remember the on top figure but 580,was with my taxes out. Now doing in home daycare in Ohio I bring in close to 800 a week after I take out my own taxes.

Anonymous said...

What about nannies in Northern New Jersey. Whats the average wage?
Per hour?

Anonymous said...

10:48 AM
I am a highly paid nanny on the UES. I have an BA. I swim, ride (horses), speak French, and play the piano. I am certified in infant/child CPR, and first aid. I have teaching experience, and several years of experience as a nanny. I am equally comfortable with newborns, and AP homework.

I don't understand your snide question about having a PhD. Are you aware that there are many people working in other fields making more than $800 a week, who do not have PhDs? People who don't even have undergraduate degrees in fact. My plummer!

Anonymous said...

It's "plumber", genius. Or maybe it's "plummer" in French. That must be it.

Anonymous said...

To 1:12 AM

Well, obviously, highly paid UES did not get my point being so educated! What I meant was it is difficult to find professional, educated nannies in NYC, who deserve a good salary. The majority of ladies working as 'nannies' or 'baby nurses' do not have CPR/not educated, yet feel they deserve salaried of $700+ a week or hourly rates of $20! This was my point.

Anonymous said...

Hi! OP here. Thanks so much for everyones input. Wow, what a wide range of salary suggestions. I did hire a girl who is lovely. I did the whole full background check, references. She is CPR certified and has 5 years experience as a nanny with twins. She does not have a college degree but I feel that is not relevant to the position anyway. There are plenty of smart people out there who never attended college. I have decided to pay her $900 / week off the books, I will be paying medical insurance for her and she will have 2 weeks paid vacation, all major holidays paid, 5 paid sick days and paid when we go away which is usually 3 weeks a year. She will get full use of my apartments gym and pool. She accepted the offer and will start next Monday. Thanks again, everyone.

Nanny sans PhD said...

I honestly do not understand why you have to have a PhD in order to make a high nanny salary. To be honest if I attended college all of those years I certainly would not be working in someone's home looking after their children! I am a highly qualified nanny with nearly 15 years experience with wide age ranges and impeccable references and I attended college on year after high school. I am intelligent and well read and believe I have the qualifications to be making a top salary. To be a great nanny you either have it or you don't. It's something that comes naturally and is instinctual things that cannot be taught in college. I think it's wonderful that some people have continued their education but it definitely should not be the determining factor when hiring a nanny.

Anonymous said...

Aveage wage for Nannies in Northern, NJ - from what I have heard from exp. qualified nannies is- $15+ per hour for live-in.
$17+ for live out.

Anonymous said...

OP-
Sorry to hear you are going to pay off the books-
why did you decide to not pay legally?

You may want to check out this website:
www.legallynanny.com

UmassSlytherin said...

1:24,
I wondered the same thing. It just doesn't make sense to me.

chick said...

OP, I'll chime in here to ask what is behind your decision to pay your nanny illegally?

There are a multitude of nanny tax services that will do all the work for you when you choose to pay legally - if nanny is unwilling to be paid on the books, what else will she be willing to cut corners on?

And what if she gets injured on the job? If you pay under the table, you open yourself up to potential lawsuits when nanny can't get unemployment/workers comp if she can't work due to an injury suffered at your home.

AND WHAT IF THINGS END BADLY? Nanny can go to the IRS and report you for failing to pay her properly. Yes, she'll have to pay back taxes too, but YOU have the $$ and will have the IRS looking ovwer your shoulder for years.

Sorry to be a downer, I just really feel passionately about nannies being paid on the books, because to me, that equates with being a professional.

chick said...

Yikes, sorry for the all caps above - my shift key got stuck!

UmassSlytherin said...

Absolutely, Chick, well-said. I couldn't agree more. Everything should be done on the up-and-up. Take it from someone who is self-employed. I pay quite a bit in self-employment tax, but it is sooo worth it for the peace of mind I get in return.

Anonymous said...

OP here-she requested to be paid off the books. I was willing to pay on the books if you notice in my original posting but she requested it. I want to accommodate her wishes and make her happy. Maybe after she works the rest of the year I will ask if we can switch to on the books because I would much rather do it legally also. As far as the tax break --we really dont need it. Again, thank you all!!!!:)

chick said...

OP, do yourself a favor, and consider the $900 per week her net pay, and then "gross-up" her weekly pay to $1365 per week, and pay her legally.

Why? Because the chances of her agreeing to have taxes taken out "next year" are nil. She'll be very used to taking home $900 per week, and she will NOT agree to have her take home drop to $636.87.

If you can't afford to take the full hit of paying the taxes yourself, consider dropping her pay slightly so that she is at least paying a portion of the taxes she is legally required to pay. Then you can pay the rest, right?

https://secure.gtmassociates.com/calculator.aspx

https://secure.gtmassociates.com/calculator.aspx

GTM, breedlove, 4nannytaxes, or just google "nanny tax" - it's easy!

UmassSlytherin said...

OP, you really should reconsider and pay her legally, on the books. Tax break aside, you do not want to risk an audit. Chick gave you some very good advice.

Anonymous said...

8:54 AM
"What I meant was it is difficult to find professional, educated nannies in NYC, who deserve a good salary."

Then that is what you should have said, but what you said was:

"Can I ask those Nannies getting paid paid more than $800/week in UES, what their credentials are? Are you college graduates/PHds in childcare as well as having a number of years of nanny experience?"

I was simply answering your question. : >)

Anonymous said...

OP-
Why does she want to be paid off the books?

DO you really want to start a relationship with someone by knowingly breaking the law?

If you truely want a professional nanny- I'd find one who wants to be paid on the books.

You said you'd be willing to pay legally- why are you letting her change your mind?

Anonymous said...

OP: PLEASE be carefuly hiring someone off the books. People who work that way do not have an employment history that shows up on a background check no matter how could a service you went through and could very well have had issues in the past. Also, it is a character thing. Oftentimes nannies who work off the books are collecting public assistance at the same time or are not even legally able to work in the US (would you be able to tell a falsified green card from a real one?).

Anonymous said...

12:22
Absolutely correct.
I've seen it firsthand, and the Employers are none the wiser.

"Oftentimes nannies who work off the books are collecting public assistance at the same time or are not even legally able to work in the US (would you be able to tell a falsified green card from a real one?)"

You are opening yourself up to all kinds of negatives, OP. I'd re-think about your decision to pay your nanny off the books.
Do you really want to be a party to all of the laws this nanny is capable of breaking? And how would you know anyway? She's already proven her character by asking to be paid off the books.

UmassSlytherin said...

Oh, I hope OP changes her mind before it is too late! :(

Anonymous said...

I agree with UMass and Chick about paying on the books. My brother is a CPA and we had a long talk before I took my current job. I am being paid as an independent contractor. Since I'm only working part time, and I'm a full time student, I never end up owing any taxes. It works out well for me. It would make me really nervous to get paid off the books. Partially for the reasons mentioned above, like an injury on the job, but also because I can't show income when I want to apply for credit or an apartment. My brother also told me that having non verifiable (sp?) income for for longer than a year will negatively affect my ability to get a Small Business Loan when I graduate.

nycnanny said...

All of the above, recent posters all make very good points. But whether or not she pays on or off the books is really her decision and her business. I am a nanny who is paid off the books . I am a citizen and willing to do it on the books but the family just gives me $900 a week. They said its just easier for them. They also pay my health insurance. I think you can be a good and "professional" nanny and get paid off the books-maybe this nanny has just always been paid off the books and is accustomed to it? In any event, best of luck to you OP. I hope it works out!

chick said...

IMO, paying or being paid off the books is disrespectful.

To the employee, who has no verifiable income,

To all other people in the same profession who pay their fair share of taxes, regardless of how much of a pain it is,

To legally employed people of all backgrounds.

I am fully in favor of the passage of the Fair Tax, simply so that no one can cheat their way out of paying taxes anymore, unless they go completely barter/cash free.

www.fairtax.org - the better way to fund our government.

UmassSlytherin said...

Agreed, Chick!

And to nycnanny @ 2:08, I disagree strongly with what you said. It is not "their business." Rather, it is all of our business: all of us who pay taxes fairly and by the book. All those of us who do not cheat the system, as you are doing if you are not claiming your income.

I'm sorry, but in my opinion, you cannot be a professional nanny and not claim your income. It is not the professional thing to do. I'm sure you are good at what you do. But no, in my opinion, no professional engages in tax fraud, which is exactly what you are doing if you are not claiming your income or if you are paying a full-time employee off the books.

nycnanny said...

I have been a "professional" nanny for the past 10 years. Out of those 10 years I was paid on the books, its just this past job that I have taken that is off the books. I will probably at the end of the year be given a 1099 but Im not sure. I dont feel I am cheating anyone. Ive been paying taxes for years this is the 1st time I have EVER been paid off the books. They requested off the books--not me. I did have an issue with it at first but then I figured I could still take care of it at the end of the year. I can still claim income -my aunt is an accountant and has advised me on how to do so. Just because HE isnt taking my taxes out of my pay doesnt mean I cant claim income at the end of the year!!!!

UmassSlytherin said...

It means that if you claim it and they do not, they are screwed. Do you know their reasoning for wanting to pay you off the books? I would be curious to know. and FYI, if they are requesting to pay you off the books, they are expecting you NOT to claim it, chief. So if you do at the end of the year, don't you think that will piss them off?

Either way, it's the wrong thing to do. Sorry to burst your nyc bubble.

nycnanny said...

umass, there is no reason to call me "chief" , make a reference about nyc and get snotty with me. All I am saying is that they figured it would be easier to pay off the books for payroll purposes-I told them that I would plan on doing my taxes at the end of the year so they already know that. If they choose not to give me a 1099 that is on them-I already told them what I plan on doing. Besides they make over a million dollars a year, I highly doubt I would screw them in anyway. I agree 100% that it is better to pay on the books, I am not disagreeing with you on that. I am a nanny by profession and I take my job very seriously. That they are choosing not to take taxes out was their decision not mine.

Anonymous said...

NYC Nanny:
Your aunt may think you can file as self employed. This was possible in the past, but the law has been changed. And, are you aware that Social Security is 15%, half to be paid by the employer, half by the employee? If you do find a way to file as self employed, you will have to pay the employer's share, the whole 15%.
That happened to me, and it was a good hunk of $.
Sadder but wiser Nanny

nycnanny said...

Yikes, 8:36 I will look into this , thanks for giving the heads up. We discussed this awhile back so I will talk to her tonight. If that is the case I am going to have to insist that I get paid ON the books starting soon. Im not sure how much they are going to like that though since they will need to pay me more in order for me gross my current salary. Thanks again!

UmassSlytherin said...

self-employed here, and it is 15.3 % in my state. I pay it.

and good choice, nycnanny. talk to them. be on the same page. you don't want headaches with the irs, trust me!

UmassSlytherin said...

p.s. self-employed but not as a nanny. the self-employment tax is hefty, and is IN ADDITION to state and federal, fyi.

Anonymous said...

nycnanny: depending on how many hours you work per week (40 or more), your employer is required to purchase unemployment insurance through the state of NY. If they get caught not doing so, which they will if you declare the income, there is a hefty fine.

Strongly suggest you speak to them about this and recommend they speak to an accountant before choosing to pay you off the books.

Anonymous said...

I'm a nanny in nyc for almost 5 yrs I've been working this kind of job as a nanny,housekeeping and a cook .for 20 yrs I travel every where with my different imployer...after I read all the message I got surprised I never had a salary like a 1000 like now I'm working from 8 am to 6:45 pm.monday to friday not saturday I got most holidays but no benifet and I got paid 750 and I did housekeeping, cooking and a babysitter for the 10 yrs old twin..I'm just writing this because I want to know if I got paid right please let me know thanks nyc..

Anonymous said...

Call CCA program at St. John's university in Oakdale. They send aupairs all over the country, these aupairs are usually from Europe and alot cheaper then what your paying