Wednesday

Bonding the Nanny...

Received Wednesday, June 11, 2008 - Perspective & Opinion
Should I ask my potential nanny to purchase a dishonesty bond? If so, what is the normal amount I should expect? Thank you, L

30 comments:

Anonymous said...

What is a dishonesty bond?

NVNanny said...

I had to google it myself! Something to do with trusting the nanny with your money...

JerseyXJacqui said...

If you don't trust the nanny with your money then why the hell would you trust her with your child/ren?

TexasNanny said...

You need to put your child in daycare. If you are that worried over money you don't need ANY employee in your home.

Anonymous said...

Wow, I'm a bit confused. If you believe your nanny is going to stuff your jewelry down her underwear or back a truck up to the door and steal your furniture, why employ her at all?

Anonymous said...

crazy-making.
:(

Anonymous said...

I agree that you shouldn't hire a nanny you can't trust but no nanny shows her true colors when you're interviewing. Things can go south quickly if there is a disagreement or the nanny wants more money and is denied.

Anonymous said...

When you hire a nanny, you become an employer--and there are a lot of things you need to consider and prepare for. First off, you need to pay payroll taxes. You should cover your nanny with workers compensation and consider buying liability coverage for yourself in case the nanny sues you. You should also check her reference, perform a background check of her criminal record, and check her driving record. If she's going to be driving your child in her car, you need to verify that she has car insurance. Or, add her to your auto insurance policy if she's going to be driving your car. YOu can also purchase something called a fidelity bond--which covers you if she steals from you.

mpp said...

Whatever happened to Homeowner's Insurance?

Most Dishonesty bonds/Fidelity bonds are for larger Companies.
Usually an Agency will insure their Nannies because it helps to build trust with the Clients, and it's just good business practice.
The Agency knows that if the Nanny ever steals anything, they will recover it financially for the Homeowner/Employer through the insurance.
And it gives the Client peace of mind.

But you're wanting to ask your Nanny to purchase this insurance for herself?
That's going to be a hard pill for her to swallow.

If you can't trust your Nanny in your home, what is she doing taking care of your kids?
Are you sure you want to ask her to do this? If so, I hope you plan on paying her very well because depending on how much you want her to insure herself for, it probably won't be cheap.

Anonymous said...

Nannies should do criminal background checks, and credit checks on potential employers, and if they have previously employed a nanny, ask to contact her for a reference.

mpp said...

5:53
It should be that way, shouldn't it? Why is it fair for the Employer to get all the perks of knowing who she's hiring?

A Nanny has just as much right to know who she's going to be working for.

Anonymous said...

I had no idea what this bond was until I read the comments. I agree with many of the others. If you can't trust your nanny with money, how can you trust her with your kids? I wouldn't hire her in the first place!

Marissa M. said...

Be careful, your nanny might be terribly offended and leave without notice

Anonymous said...

4:47,
oftentimes, employers also do not show their true colors at an interview: they seem sweet enough until they start expecting you to do things you did not sign on to do, or when they begin coming home later and later each night.

Anonymous said...

Ignore.

This post is just chumming the waters.

denise k said...

To whoever wrote this post,
What you should do is go find a big, thorny stick and shove it straight up your ass. Idiot.

Anonymous said...

Yikes! What is the need for all this discussion? It's rediculous, end of story.

Anonymous said...

I agree. I think the question has been answered to the best of our ability.

Anonymous said...

How dare you guys negate the OP's question--it's very legitimate. When you hire a nanny, it's an employer-employee relationship, and having your nanny bonded against theft is a very legitimate thing to think about. I think the "crazy-makers" are the ones who have called the OP crazy. And as for 9:06, you are RUDE!!!!!!!! What you wrote isn't nice to say to anyone, ever--you should be ashamed of YOURSELF!!!!!!!!! You're RUDE RUDE RUDE!!!!

mpp said...

9:17
I can only speculate, but I think some of the posters (who very well may be Nannies) are probably upset that OP would ask her Nanny to get a Fidelity bond.
And I think for 2 reasons:
1. As was mentioned throughout the thread, why would OP ask Nanny to do this? If she trusted her with her beloved children, why not her belongings?
2. It may also be a financial hardship for the Nanny, depending on how much OP thought her prized possession's were worth.
And most Bond Companies want the money up front, in full, they don't take monthly payments.

Another thing OP should know about. I don't think if something comes up missing, she can outright accuse her Nanny.
Most Fidelity Insurance Bond Companies will not pay out unless they have proof from the Homeowner that the Nanny stole from them.

I think OP's best bet would be to do her homework and find the most trustworthy candidate. Not just for the safety of her belongings, but more importantly, her children.
And if something does come up missing, just put the claim on your Homeowner's Insurance Policy.

UmassSlytherin said...

agreed mpp.
and I'm sorry OP: you are right, there is no cause for people to be rude, or to comment about hawt b-list celebs, at any time. (I don't know WHY people do that!) That being said, I would never buy a bond like OP is talking about. I would not feel it was worth it to me financially when there are other families who would hire me without my having to pay this expense.
As mpp suggested, just be really careful to check references, and do a backround check or fingerprint check. This I would consider legit and I would pay for it (it is about 40.00) but I would not buy myself a dishonesty bond.
Your primary concern should be finding a trustworthy candidate who you trust with your children, not finding someone who wouldn't steal your diamonds and shoes and stuff.
(also, perhaps you could purchase a safe for your really valuable items you keep in the home, if you are that worried.)

Anonymous said...

Let's stop attacking the OP. I invited a classmate over to study and she stole my watch and emptied my medicine cabinet. You never know.

mpp said...

Umass!
Well, there you go! Great suggestion!
Just last year, I invested the money in getting a fireproof, waterproof, thiefproof, and everythingelseproof safe.
Best money ever spent, and I have peace of mind.

A good floor safe weighs several hundred pounds, and can cost anywhere from $500.00 - $1000.00 (average, depending on size) .... and I have all my important documents and jewelry in there.
Maybe that would be something you could do, OP?

11:40
Some of us are trying to help.

mpp said...

Oh, and sorry about what your friend did. Not cool.

Kaitlyn said...

OP, I think you have a legitimate question and my honest answer is that you should not ask her to purchase one, period. Have it covered under your homeowner's insurance. I would not be offended if I knew that my employer had themselves insured against employee theft, but I would be extremely offended if I was asked to pay for a dishonesty bond. The name "dishonesty bond" in itself seems insulting. Hell, once an employee has purchased a dishonesty bond, what's to stop her from stealing? It's not like you're getting the short end of the stick--the insurance company would pay for it. I would seriously reconsider asking your nanny to purchase that bond, and just have it covered under homeowner's insurance--and there's no need to tell her about it.

LindaLou said...

in my professional life, i've always worked at places where i've had access to large amounts of money (banks and insurance companies). companies like that always bond their employees and you can't work there unless you are bondable. it's not a personal insult to be bonded. that being said, it's the employer's responsibility to bond the employee. she wouldn't be bonding herself. it also doesn't make much sense unless the nanny would be coming in contact with large amounts of money. HTH.

Anonymous said...

HTH?

UmassSlytherin said...

maybe it means "help the hippogriffs," kind of like "save the whales?"

Anonymous said...

HTH=Hope That Helps.

Anonymous said...

Well your nanny doesnot pay for that bond. YOu do. I almost think it is kind of strange, that people trust their kids with the nanny but not their "stuff".
My former sister in law and her husband had a safe built into their basement floor to protect their jewels and money. While on vacation someone broke in and robbed them and cleaned out the safe. If you are keepong money and jewels around go rent a safe deposit box. If it were me and I didn't trust the nanny around my stuff I sure wouldn't have her /him around my children.