Monday

Two Nanny Questions

Received Monday, May 7, 2007

1) Hi everyone! I know this is not an i saw your nanny post but I need some advice. I have been with my family for almost a year and we recently talked about my yearly raise that is coming up. The family is wonderful and the 3 children are all under 6 years old. I have more than met their expectations of me by doing extra things that were not originally talked about during the interview. I really love the children and the parents are great people to work for. The dad told me to "come up with a number" for my yearly raise! I don't want to ask for too much, but I would like to be compensated appropriately for my hard work this past year. Any help would be appreciated and as I said before, I know this isn't an I saw your nanny post but I would love any advice!

2) Hi! I am a nanny. I work for a family with two children one is four and the other 18 months. For the most part I only care for the baby but on occasion I do care for their older child too. When I have both children they do not pay me anymore than when I just have the one. Also, mom is often 5-10 minutes late getting home. This, I know, is minor; but when it happens often, is never mentioned and I do not get paid for this time, I start to feel taken advantage of. Also, I have been working for this family for almost one year now and would like to ask for a raise, especially since summer is coming and I will be caring for both children. How do I approach the parents about a raise? It is difficult because I love these two children very much and the parents are kind, I just think they tend to over look things once in a while. Any advice? As parents how would you want to be approached about this? Thanks!

38 comments:

Jennifer V. said...

1) I would think at the very least $25-$35 more per week, would be an appropriate raise. Thats $100-$140 per month.

2) I would approach the parents by saying something along the lines of "As you may know I have been working for you for almost a year. I'd like to sit down with you sometime this week and discuss my progress and a raise." And you should definitely get paid more when you have both children. I would say 1 1/2 the amount you normally make.

Kristin L said...

1) I agree with Jennifer V. on the raise!

2) I work for a family with 2 children. When I have just the baby I get $12/hour; when I have both children I get $15/hour.

Anonymous said...

1) if the family used an agency to find you, find out the fee. divide fee by 52 weeks and that should be your minimum raise per week.

2) you don't break down a nanny job by when you have both children. You either are responsible for just one child all the time or you have two. It doesn't matter if you work for a sahm who busies herself with one. Hell no. You must procede as if you are taking care of 2.
Do they call when they are late?
Are you on time?

Anonymous said...

sorry to say both of these questions are boring.

Anonymous said...

7:11, does it excite you to read everyday about children getting treated badly?!

Anonymous said...

1)Good for you that you work for a wonderful family that appreciates
what you do for their family!!

2)Was it disscussed when you started? Under what cicumstances do you watch the older child? And finally, what did you do last summer? If you had the same situation last summer and did not speak up about wanting additional money, they may assume you're ok with what you are paid. I would definately approach them about how you would like to disscuss a pay raise. Also, ask them if your hours need to change to accomidate their getting home at a later time. If your upfront and polite, I'm sure they will see no fault with your wanting a pay raise.

Anonymous said...

711, you sound boring to me...go away!

Anonymous said...

It is hard to say what a raise should be without knowing more details, such as current salary and responsibilities. Location is also a factor.
The average yearly cost of living increase is around 3%, so basically the first 3% of a raise is just an adjustment for the cost of living. A dollar an hour is one way raises are frequently given, so for instance if you work a 50 hour week, the raise would be $50. Sometimes perks are offered rather than $. They might be paying for health insurance, a monthly Metro card, more vacation time, a plane ticket home etc.
A nanny

Anonymous said...

for question 2.) I would sit down and have a chat with them. Something along the lines of, "I love working with the kids, and I'm really looking forward to the summer. With more responsibilty around the house, would you consider a small salary increase?"

As for usually being 5-10 minutes late... I've never had a job where my employers said, "I will be home at exactly 5:47." Errands, work schedules, commute times always vary. If you feel that it's happening to a fault then consider talking to them about it, but I would probably just let it go.

Anonymous said...

Actually, unless it was discussed at the interview that you would care for only one child, you have very little to say. From my expereince you sound like a young girl and I would fire you. You are clock watching. People who have professions cant always get home at the exact specified time. Then to ask for more when two are around. As for doing extra, you should. An 18 month old naps and you have the opportunity to do extra. This woman is away from her house for many hours and I am sure your help is appreciated and also expected. It is bad work ethic to expect to get extra for every additional chore. That's not how real jobs are.

Anonymous said...

Let the family know how you feel but i agree that you are clock watching and it will drive you crazy, real jobs ARE tough. you do deserve a yearly raise and should ask for one. if you don't talk about something that is bothering you, it will grow into something larger. you are lucky you get along well w/your employers and it sounds like they are also lucky to have you. but 5-10 min is not a big deal. it could easily be the same rate for 1 or 2 kids, that is the advantage for them to have a nanny over daycare, where you pay per child.

Anonymous said...

9:23 - if parents I am working for are consistently late, I wouldn't be happy either. It wouldn't be fair to fire someone just because they may expect a little more if you are consistently late. What's not fair is being consistently late and not compensating. In the 'real world' as you called it, people get paid for overtime, and that is exactly what this is. Now if it was only a once in awhile time thing then I would agree with you, but not when it happens consistently.

Anonymous said...

Being a nanny myself, i understand where you are coming from. My employer is late everyday. Supposedly, i was to get off at 4:00 everyday. But it's more like 5:00..EVERYDAY!! Yes the real world does not clock watch, but you do get over time. You should speak up for yourself and ask for the raise, and if it's rejected, then simply give your notice. Just say you wish you could stay longer, and you really enjoy the children, but your looking for something a little higher. it doesnt have to be a big situation. Kindness goes a long way.

Anonymous said...

You should get 1/2 as much pay more if you are watching two kids; for example, if you get $12 for one child, you should get $18 for two. That's fair, though you could negotiate a middle ground, too.

On the 5-10 minutes late, that's worth bringing up if its consistent. How does she feel when you are 5-10 minutes late to work? I hope she is flexible with your time, too.

Anonymous said...

I am surprised at some of the responses. Here in NYC, it is common practice to pay a higher rate for a second child. With two children, daycare is less expensive than a nanny.
In the "real world" increased responsibilities do bring raises, it is usually called a promotion.
If you need a flexible quit time from your nanny, that should have been agreed upon when you hired her.
I have seen many complaints on parenting boards about nannies being 5 or 10 minutes late every day, and the consensus seems to be to fire her. If parents are consistently late, and don't call, it shows a lack of consideration that will show up in other areas as well. As for the nanny with the employer who is an hour late, I would start looking for a new job.
Nanny who is never late!

Anonymous said...

923-yes that is how real jobs are. If you are putting in more hours and more responsablities, then you are going to get a bonus, promotion, or raise. If you are constantly doing more than was negotionated upon taking a job, then you damn well better get more money. 5-10 mins, not a problem, but still a favor. Show some class, follow the golden rule. Oh I forgot, most people these days don't know what that is.

Anonymous said...

These questions are not "boring" they are valid! I used to be a nanny and the family would always ALWAYS come home late: 10 minutes means you could miss your train or bus: ten minutes every day adds up to alot of money over the weeks and months that you work for these losers.
I think these questions are valid and I agree with most of the posters here: 25 to 50 dollars a week is fair, and it's either one or two kids: it doesn't matter if you only care for the second child some of the time: it's still two kids.

Anonymous said...

923- so if your nanny showed up 5-10 min late for work everyday you would overlook that? Nannies do have lives and families outside of their jobs...

Anonymous said...

For #2, I mostly agree with 9:23, in that, *unless* you were specifically hired to only care for the baby, then it is improper to ask for more money when you are caring for two kids. If you've typically cared for only the baby until now, then you've gotten lucky.

When a new baby is born into the family, that is often a time when nannies are given raises. But when you were hired by a family with two existing kids, to care for the kids, and one kid often attends nursery school but is off for the summer, you still have to care for both of them for the agreed upon pay, and it is inappropriate to ask for more money simply because you will have both kids over the summer.

Similarly, it would be ridiculous to ask for more money for the hour that a playdate comes over, while you are caring for an extra kid. And it would be ridiculous for an employer to dock a few dollars of pay when your charge goes to a friend's house for an hour, because you are then caring for one fewer child for that hour.

If your employer is often or sometimes late by only 5-10 minutes it seems that this should be overlooked.

If they are 100% consistently not able to get home at the stated time, then this should be discussed and a new dismissal time should be declared. But a nanny is typically on salary so 5-10 minutes should not make a difference and should be overlooked by the employee.

If you really think you are being cheated out of money that you earned for the 5-10 minutes, then there seems to be something wrong in this situation. Perhaps you will want to calculate the small amount that you feel you are owed and ask your employers for this sum. However, it is likely they will not look kindly on this (even though they may grant the request and pay you the small sum). Making such a request will create ill will and does not seem worth it, or appropriate, to me.

Anonymous said...

10-15 minutes can mean missing an appointment, a train or simply adding up to extra time that you've worked during the week.

This happened to me when I first began working. My hours were clearly stated as being 745-545, but then it became 745-600, 745-615....without any discussion between the parent and the nanny this is not acceptable. Mention it to your employer, they may not realize that it's happening (mine didn't at first) or they may be missing their train, meetings running late, etc.

After talking with my employers the situation seemed to improve for the most part. The biggest improvement on their part was them calling to let me know they were running late and they began compensating me if it became excessive.

Anonymous said...

I need to get a new apartment in July when my lease expires. A month ago I asked the mother that I worked for if I could have a notarized letter about how much money I make per month, since she pays me in cash and doesn't file any taxes for me. She said she'd talk to her husband about it.

Today, I e-mailed her again asking her if I could have that notarized letter and if she talked to him about it and she said that they agreed it wouldn't be a good idea, but she'd be glad to call them.

Why is this a big deal? I need to get an apartment to LIVE in! I'm furious. I do everythingggg for that family. I even worked on my aniversary so the mother could go to the spa. The house is always immaculate, the children well fed and happy, diapers always changed - I take the kids to the park, get them presents for birthdays & when they have accomplishments (such as using the potty for the first time) and I just don't understand why getting a notary is such a big deal.

Advice... please!

Anonymous said...

Getting a notary is a big deal to them-because they'd be admitting that they are breaking the law- by paying you under the table- something a nanny should never do!
and now you are learning that rule the hard way by not being able to show proof of your income.

Visit this website to learn more about being paid on the books and the penalities if you are caught.
www.legallynanny.com

Anonymous said...

I agree with 3:53. If you want to be legal, you are responsible for paying taxes on your income. Your employers are not resposible...they are only responsible for paying your social security. So, if you want to have proof of income, start filing tax returns and declaring your income. It will costs your employer's 7.5% more because of the social security, but it will cost you a lot more than that in taxes...the price we all pay for being "on the books".

Anonymous said...

mostly these questions annoy me but I though I would make an exception and add my opinion. People who don't work on the books and people who don't pay on the books are slimeballs & degenerates.
Anti American hooligans.

Anonymous said...

8:28 - Wow, I thought that you would give me good advice, instead you insult me? If I am wasting your time, then get off of this website! Don't call me a slime ball or an anti-American hooligan... that's rude, and un-educated. I hope you're not rasing your charge to do that! Your assumptions, attitude, and the people like you are who make Americans look bad. Not people like me. I honor my country.

Thank you, 7:24, for the link- I'm going to investigate that immediately. I really wanted to be legal when I started nannying - I told the agency that I was working with when I was looking for employment that I wanted to pay taxes, and how you go about doing that. The woman who owned the agency admitted to me that she had no idea.... isn't that odd? I still don't know what to do about the notary... I really am thinking of looking for a new nannying position because the famiy I work for is so... weird and stingy. They wouldn't want to pay 7.5 percent more for S.S. - I think they'd rather get another nanny.

And I don't take it personally anymore because I know that I do a really great job taking care of my charge and I know that I'm among the top ranks when it comes to nannies. All the other familes I've worked for in the past have felt blessed to have me, and have shown their apprectiation and gratitude.

I just have to find the right family again who appreciates me and doesn't mind when I want to be legal about it.

Anonymous said...

Oops, I meant to thank 3:53 - Thanks 3:53 & 7:24

Anonymous said...

1037,
perhaps she was a bit harsh but she is correct. Those employers who do not pay their help (whether it is a landscaper, sitter or nanny) on the books are making it difficult for the well intentioned, law abiding employers and employees as well as contributing to the destruction of our American economy.

Anonymous said...

OP, a reputable agency always tells employers they must pay on the books. It is the employers responsibility to pay into your S.S., and unemployment/workmans com. insurance. If they are not doing this, they are breaking the law, and exploiting you. I strongly advise you to look for a new job.
A Nanny

Anonymous said...

You have no right to judge this person you do not know. Circumstances seem to be out of her control, and it is not that easy to just drop your job and find a new one. Would any of you working mothers do that?

As for the original two questions, I recently gave my nanny a raise of $75 per week; last year raised it $50 per week. We also give her a holiday bonus, and paid vacation time.

Parents: if you like your nanny, keep them in mind. I used to be a nanny myself and it is the parents who tend to be more difficult than the children. They are caring for these children who you say are the most important things to you, so pay your nanny accordingly.

BOTH: Make sure to periodically sit down with one another and, openly, talk over changes in the situation, discuss pay, concerns, etc... This will keep problems from arising and building up over time, if regularly discussed.

As for the two children, it really depends upon what the initial agreement was. But make sure to talk to your employer about what you are thinking. Maybe you two can arrive at an agreement.

Anonymous said...

Notarized letter? I wonder if you REALLY need the notarized letter to get an apartment or to blackmail the family? I have never heard of an apartment requiring a notarized letter to verify employment and compensation. It sounds suspicious. The landlord should be okay with calling your employment reference on your rental application or asking for paystubs. How about providing bank statements to your potential landlord to show when and how much you are paid based upon your deposits. That is what self-employed people have to provide. In the case where you don't have paystubs you will have to find a landlord who can work with you and call your employer to verify income and length of employment and/or provide the bank statements. I cannot imagine Dell, GE, Kraft, Circuit City, or any other major employer would provide a notarized letter of employment. Certainly it cannot be expected of your employer either.

Anonymous said...

Although my children are grown, I know how hard good nannies work. I also know how valuable a good and loving nanny is. I think a 20-25%raise is reasonable, especially for taking care of an additional child all summer and certainly after 3 years of employment!

Anonymous said...

I think for number one you need to think of something that isn't outlandish...like the 3%.
2.I am a nanny as well and it drives me nuts when she pays me for 8am-5pm and she comes home at 5:10. She should be home at the exact time or pay you for the 10 min over. I figure it out this way...She wants me at her house at least 5 minutes before 8am (which I don't get paid for) so she should be home 5 minutes before. I am never late and if I was S*** would hit the fan. You also have to figure that they don't pay you for the time that they sit there and talk to you about the day (which is fine) so you need to be compensated for the time you get there to the time she gets home. If it is an issue then say, "Can you add an extra hour on a week for the 5-10min. extra that I am here each day?"

Anonymous said...

I think you should raise your pay by how much it was last year or something like that.

Anonymous said...

5:57 PM
Of course those employers wouldn't need to provide a notarized letter, they pay ON THE BOOKS! Her problem is, her employer is not paying on the books, so she has no proof of income. In the city I live in, that would make it virtually impossible to rent an apt. The reason they don't want to provide the letter is because what they are doing is ILLEGAL!

Anonymous said...

5:57 is a conspiracy theorist and an idiot. Of course she needs a notarized letter. Of course her employers dont want to do it because they are degenerative panty waists that dont pay their employees on the books. And no, it is not up to the nanny to pay taxes. It is the EMPLOYER who is responsible for putting nanny on the books. Give her a W4 and she damn well has to pay taxes. What is wrong with you 557? What is wrong with people who dont pay taxes? What is wrong with you?
I just won't deal with you. I won't. I won't do it.

Anonymous said...

5:57... how could the nanny show paystubs... she gets paid in cash! I had to prove how much I made per year to get my 1st apartment, by getting a letter from the human resource source department from the Public Library where I worked. Not a paystub, not a deposit notice. It's not unusual... the employers are breaking the law and should be fined, it's as simple as that.

Anonymous said...

back to the getting home late - my people are often late, which at this point is the least of my worries, however, how hard would it be to say, hi! So sorry I'm running late today instead of ignoring it. I mean i just think it is so weird. who are these people?

Anonymous said...

in response to the original questions and some of the rude responses they have gotten:
1) this nanny is not asking for a raise, she was TOLD she was getting a raise and to give them a number, so don't get on her case about asking for a raise being inappropriate. i think the very first response of $25-$30 more a week was right on. if you are paid hourly, i would say $1-$2/hr more.

2) if you were hired to take care of one child and the employers began to tack on the extra child, then you are entitled to increased pay for the hours worked with the extra child, again $1-$2/hr more. if this possibility was not discussed during your hiring process, then sitting down with the employers to talk about it is completely fair. maybe say, "i'd like to take some time whenever it's convenient for you to check in about the hours and work." that way, your employer can let you know anything she's been meaning to tell you, and you can bring up your concenrs as well.

as for the nanny needing proof of employment, i really feel for you. while having a nanny off the books is illegal and inadvisable, it's also all to common. people who pay their nanny off the books should do what they can to help nanny maintain access to housing/healthcare/etc which requires proof of income. if they'd rather not leave the paper trail (what are they so afraid of anyway? if they're that scared to notarize a letter, what other financial indescretions are they hiding?) then a phonecall to the landlord ought to suffice. hope this helps!