Monday

Herald Square in NYC

Received Monday, December 4, 2006
I saw your nanny today at approximately 11:30 a.m. in the Herald Square area with your two children. She had a Macy's shopping bag, so she had already been to Macy's. She was pushing two young children, both under three, one as young as 10 months. She was pushing a silver 3 wheeled double stroller that had black handles and the name /brand [?]"Jane" on it. It was cold, and crowded before lunch and your nanny was singing with the older child. Singing. As she walked down the street. And smiling. And both children were bundled up and smiling. The older child that was singing was a fair haired boy who was also laughing. In a crowd of pedestrians, the three of them stood out and brought a smile to my face.
The medium height, heavyset, African American nanny wore her straight hair shoulder length & was wearing a mint & cream colored jacket, black jeans & brown shoes or boots. In response to your anticipated question, yes I am certain she was the nanny. And no, I am not the nanny writing about myself. I have enclosed my contact information as I submit this [do not publish] so that the blog proprietor may verify this account.
-Helen

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

isn't it weird that no one has much to say about a good sighting? I mean am I being totally negative or isn't this what people are being paid for. I can see why it would make you happy- a laughing child is always a delight. But congratulating a nanny for nannying correctly is a bit like applading the fed ex man who delivers the second day air package on the second day.

Anonymous said...

I totally disagree with the commenter above. This sighting absolutely made me smile and it's a great thing to publish: maybe this women's employer will see the sighting and recognize what a great woman she has caring for her children. It's part of the reason I read this sight, the off chance that someone will spot my nanny doing a good job.

Anonymous said...

It's too bad the kids were not having that much fun with mom and dad....we're totally scrimping on one salary but I can't imagine missing all the amazing growth and changes I've enjoyed the last 2 years with my daughter. She said/did at least a dozen adorable, funny and smart things today that I can't wait to share with her dad. Unfortunately, you just can't get that time back.

Anonymous said...

I agree. And I think the more positive sightings we share of caregivers-be they parents or nannies- they inspire us all!

Anonymous said...

To the commenter above, who is to say that the kids DON'T have that fun with mom and dad? Just because someone employs a wonderful nanny doesn't mean they're not also a wonderful parent. Do you think your husband isn't a good parent because he didn't get to see all the adorable things your daughter did during his work day? I doubt it. I bet he's a great parent who also works, just like many of us.

Anonymous said...

i agree. in my experience the best parents hire the best nannies.

K. said...

Well, this is my first time posting, and as a nanny myself this is in response to the first commenter... All too often good deeds go unnoticed (and they shouldn't)... Only a fool concentrates on bad behavior.

Anonymous said...

to the commentator who thinks that because someone has a wonderful nanny, then that must mean that they are missing out on their child's growing up - your reaction makes no sense at all. i am a mother who has a nanny 3 days a week when i work, and i am hardly missing out on my son growing up! did your husband miss out on your children's growing up because he worked?

Anonymous said...

I once knew this amazing nanny. I had a lot of contact with her and never got the chance to know the mother. I assumed the mother who was a stay at home mom was an amazing mother because they seemed to be a team and because I think a mother who wasn't so great would be jealous of a nanny who was that special. Turns out I was right and the mother is an amazing mom.

Anonymous said...

I never said people who have nannys are not good parents...Read my post again. I also didn't say they were "missing out" on the entire experience of their child growing up. I'm just glad that when my daughter has a great day in the park, it's with me. I'd hate to be sitting at a desk or staring at a computer or talking on the phone or negotiating a contract or curing cancer or whatever for 40 hours a week when I could be having fun with her. I never, ever enjoyed my career or extra money or material possessions as much as I enjoy hanging out with my kid all day. And yes, her dad does miss a ton of stuff while he's at work and working does not make him a bad parent - DUH. Believe me, if we won the lottery we'd all be at the park. And yes, I do have frustrating days with her when I feel that being at work would be a relief. And yes, I do occasionally get babysitters and drop her off with an aunt or grandma.

Annie said...

I am a nanny and I read this site for the good, the bad and the ugly. In response to the first commenter, I'd like to say that there is a HUGE difference between a nanny who is GOOD (meaning she provides patient, kind, competent care & keeps the children safe and happy) and a nanny who is GREAT (meaning she does all that a good nanny does plus forming a loving bond with the children she cares for, doing things like running around for hours in the park, rolling on the ground with them even if she gets dirty, singing silly songs in public to make them laugh even if people stare and think she's a little silly herself, etc.). I love that the users of this site take the time to point out when a nanny is going above and beyond what she's paid for out of love for her charges.

Secondly, to the commenter directly above me, in my career I have worked for some truly wonderful working mothers. Despite the fact that I believe I'd like to be home with my children (when I have them) as you are, I've grown to really respect and understand the working mothers I've known. These are women who, if they won the lottery, would continue to work because their jobs are very important to them. They know that one of the greatest things they can do for their kids is to be the happiest, healthiest, most fulfilled mother they can be--and for them, working outside the home is part of how they stay happy, healthy and fulfilled.

I guess what I'd like to say (now that I've rambled on so much) is that every family is different, and although we'd all love everyone to experience parenting as we do, I think it's important to try and keep an open mind about alternative families. And, just because it can't be said enough, I completely understand where you are coming from--I will not have a nanny when I have children of my own, I want to be there with them for every moment that I can--I just think we can never be too tolerant or understanding towards people who feel differently than ourselves.